Share

 

 

 

 

Pets & Parasites – Prevention and Treatment

Pets & Parasites – Prevention and Treatment

 

cats and dogs parasite treatmentA major concern for most responsible pet owners is the infestation of parasites and their effects on your dog or cat. With the onset of warmer weather, fleas, ticks and mosquitoes (the culprits that bring on heartworm disease) are prevalent and in search of a host to feed on your pet. They feed on the blood their blood, inject their saliva and sometimes spread disease such as Lyme disease. Their presence can cause your pet great discomfort with severe itching and scratching. An undetected problem can lead to anemia, other internal parasites, illness and sometimes fatality. 

Cats are more sensitive to parasites and it is the outdoor cat that is most susceptible. If you notice a cat parasite such as a flea or tick, intestinal worms or heartworm, treatment is not quite the same as treating a dog. Cats have much more delicate systems and require special therapy options from your veterinarian

A cat parasite common to the feline, especially as kittens, is the internal worm problem such as roundworms, hookworms, coccidian and giardia. Most are easily detected in the feces and is treated as early as possible – preferably in the young kitten. Most cats are dewormed very early on to get rid of this debilitating condition.

Outdoor cats are prone to fleas, ticks and heartworm and treatments for parasites include over-the-counter and prescription medications per the advice of your veterinarian. Many medications are available in powders, sprays and collars as well as a topical ointment, applied at the base of the neck. Because of their sensitivity, be sure your medication of choice is approved for cats. For optimum results, follow the suggestion of your veterinarian. Revolution and Advantage do have options for the treatment of parasites on cats.

The best medication therapy for your cat is prevention, which should be started in early spring. These preventatives will ward off any fleas and ticks. When it comes to the prevention of heartworm, have your cat tested to get a negative result at which time a single monthly pill is all that is necessary to protect your cat from heartworm disease.

Dogs have more options for treating and preventing a parasitic problem. Dog parasites can also include problems with intestinal worms which can be treated early on to remove the problem. However, the worm problem can continue when a dog, infested with fleas and its eggs, licks itself to ingest them. Such problems can also be present in the soil and grass where your dog may frequent. Sprays are available to treat yards from parasites that can affect your pet. If a pet has a parasite problem, it is necessary to treat the environment – home and yard – in order to control the entire problem. Larger pet supply stores can help you in choosing the right options. 

Dog parasites most often include fleas and ticks which can be controlled with numerous treatments for parasites. The best options are by prescription only and veterinarian approved. Some products such as Sentinel, Revolution and Advantage are effective in controlling fleas, ticks and heartworm as well as any intestinal worms. 

In the prevention of heartworm in dogs, be sure to get dog or puppy tested in early spring to begin the preventative treatment. Once you know your dog is free of heartworm disease, the doctor can place your pet on a once-a-month preventative plan. 

Prevention is your best option in protecting your pets from parasites so make a conscientious effort to bring your animal to your veterinarian early before the onset of warm weather and parasite season. It can be the most responsible thing you can do for the comfort, health and happiness of your pet. Watch we video on how to prevent ticks and fleas on dogs, or applying Frontline to a cat. Remember to ALWAYS consult a veterinarian.

 


Article Tags: #vets #pets #Ticks #Animals #parasite treatment #parasites #cat parasites #dog parasites #fleas #heart worm #prevention and treatment
Share     Report     Print Article
0 comments